Recent News & Updates

Refusal To Test

What is a refusal to take a DOT drug test, and what are the consequences? The DOT regulations speak to refusals in subpart I – Problems in Drug Testing. The three rules that are commonly cited are 40.191, 40.193, and 40.195. A refusal to test is much broader than the employee telling their employer that they will not have the test completed.

(a) As an employee, you have refused to take a drug test if you:

(1) Fail to appear for any test (except a pre-employment test) within a reasonable time, as determined by the employer, consistent with applicable DOT agency regulations, after being directed to do so by the employer. This includes the failure of an employee (including an owner-operator) to appear for a test when called by a C/TPA (see §40.61(a));

(2) Fail to remain at the testing site until the testing process is complete; Provided, That an employee who leaves the testing site before the testing process commences (see §40.63 (c)) for a pre-employment test is not deemed to have refused to test;

(3) Fail to provide a urine specimen for any drug test required by this part or DOT agency regulations; Provided, That an employee who does not provide a urine specimen because he or she has left the testing site before the testing process commences (see §40.63 (c)) for a pre-employment test is not deemed to have refused to test;

(4) In the case of a directly observed or monitored collection in a drug test, fail to permit the observation or monitoring of your provision of a specimen (see §§40.67(l) and 40.69(g));

(5) Fail to provide a sufficient amount of urine when directed, and it has been determined, through a required medical evaluation, that there was no adequate medical explanation for the failure (see §40.193(d)(2));

(6) Fail or decline to take an additional drug test the employer or collector has directed you to take (see, for instance, §40.197(b));

(7) Fail to undergo a medical examination or evaluation, as directed by the MRO as part of the verification process, or as directed by the DER under §40.193(d). In the case of a pre-employment drug test, the employee is deemed to have refused to test on this basis only if the pre-employment test is conducted following a contingent offer of employment. If there was no contingent offer of employment, the MRO will cancel the test; or

(8) Fail to cooperate with any part of the testing process (e.g., refuse to empty pockets when directed by the collector, behave in a confrontational way that disrupts the collection process, fail to wash hands after being directed to do so by the collector).

(9) For an observed collection, fail to follow the observer’s instructions to raise your clothing above the waist, lower clothing and underpants, and to turn around to permit the observer to determine if you have any type of prosthetic or other device that could be used to interfere with the collection process.

(10) Possess or wear a prosthetic or other device that could be used to interfere with the collection process.

(11) Admit to the collector or MRO that you adulterated or substituted the specimen.

If the employee is concerned about COVID-19 and refuses to go into the clinic to have the collection completed, it is deemed a refusal to test. If the test is considered a refusal, you must consider it as a violation. As a result, the refusal must get reported to the clearinghouse. For information on how to handle this violation, please read our other article here.

If you have any questions, please contact us! We are here anytime to assist you with compliance!

DOT CBD Notice

DOT OFFICE OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY AND COMPLIANCE NOTICE

 

The Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018, Pub. L. 115-334, (Farm Bill) removed hemp from the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act.  Under the Farm Bill, hemp-derived products containing a concentration of up to 0.3% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are not controlled substances.  THC is the primary psychoactive component of marijuana.  Any product, including “Cannabidiol” (CBD) products, with a concentration of more than 0.3% THC remains classified as marijuana, a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act.

 

We have had inquiries about whether the Department of Transportation-regulated safety-sensitive employees can use CBD products.  Safety-sensitive employees who are subject to drug testing specified under 49 CFR part 40 (Part 40) include:  pilots, school bus drivers, truck drivers, train engineers, transit vehicle operators, aircraft maintenance personnel, fire-armed transit security personnel, ship captains, and pipeline emergency response personnel, among others.

 

It is important for all employers and safety-sensitive employees to know:

 

  1. The Department of Transportation requires testing for marijuana and not CBD.

 

  1. The labeling of many CBD products may be misleading because the products could contain higher levels of THC than what the product label states. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not currently certify the levels of THC in CBD products, so there is no Federal oversight to ensure that the labels are accurate. The FDA has cautioned the public that: “Consumers should beware purchasing and using any [CBD] products.”  The FDA has stated: “It is currently illegal to market CBD by adding it to a food or labeling it as a dietary supplement.”*  Also, the FDA has issued several warning letters to companies because their products contained more CBD than indicated on the product label. **[i]

 

  1. The Department of Transportation’s Drug and Alcohol Testing Regulation, Part 40, does not authorize the use of Schedule I drugs, including marijuana, for any reason. Furthermore, CBD use is not a legitimate medical explanation for a laboratory-confirmed marijuana positive result.Therefore, Medical Review Officers will verify a drug test confirmed at the appropriate cutoffs as positive, even if an employee claims they only used a CBD product.

 

It remains unacceptable for any safety-sensitive employee subject to the Department of Transportation’s drug testing regulations to use marijuana.  Since the use of CBD products could lead to a positive drug test result, Department of Transportation-regulated safety-sensitive employees should exercise caution when considering whether to use CBD products.

 

The contents of this document do not have the force and effect of law and are not meant to bind the public in any way. This document is intended only to provide clarity to the public regarding existing requirements under the law or agency policies. This policy and compliance notice is not legally binding in its own right and will not be relied upon by the Department as a separate basis for affirmative enforcement action or other administrative penalty.  Conformity with this policy and compliance notice is voluntary only and nonconformity will not affect rights and obligations under existing statutes and regulations.  Safety-sensitive employees must continue to comply with the underlying regulatory requirements for drug testing, specified at 49 CFR part 40.

 

 

February 18, 2020

How Long Are Substances Detectable?

Have you ever wondered how long substances are detectable in a urine drug test? Below is an overview of some substances that are detected and their detection time in urine drug testing.

 

Contact us if you are interested in more information.

Opioids
Substance Detected As Detection Time in Urine
Buprenorphine Buprenorphine & Norbuprenorphine 2 to 4 days
Codeine Codeine & Morphine 2 to 3 days
Dihydrocodeine Dihyrocodeine & Hydrocodone 2 to 3 days
Fentanyl Fentanyl 1 to 3 days
Heroin 6-MAM & Morphine 8 hours
Hydrocodone Hydrocodone & Hydromorphone 1 to 3 days
Hydromorphone Hydromorphone 1 to 3 days
Levorphanol Levorphanol Unknown
Meperidine Meperidine & Normeperidine 1 to 2 days
Methadone Methadone Up to 14 days
Methadone metabolite (EDDP) 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrroldine Up to 14 days
Morphine Morphine 2 to 3 days
Oxycodone Oxycodone & Oxymorphone 2 to 3 days
Oxymorphone Oxymorphone 2 to 3 days
Propoxyphene Propoxyphene & Norpropoxyphene Up to 7 days
Tapentadol Tapentadol 2 to 3 days
Tramadol Tramadol & O-Desmethyltramadol 2 to 4 days
Benzodiazepines
Substance Detected As Detection Time in Urine
Alprazolam alpha-Hydroxyalprazolam 2 to 4 days
Chlordiazepoxide Nordiazepam Oxazepam 2 to 4 days
Clonazepam 7-Aminoclonazepam 2 to 4 days
Diazepam Nordiazepam & Oxazepam 2 to 7 days
Flunitrazepam 7-Aminoflunitrazepam Unknown
Flurazepam 2-Hydroxyethyl flurazepam Up to 20 days
Lorazepam Lorazepam 5 to 7 days
Midazolam alpha-hydroxymidazolam Unknown
Oxazepam Oxazepam 2 to 7 days
Temezpam Oxazepam & Temezepam 1 to 4 days
Triazolam alpha-Hydroxytriazolam 1 to 2 days
Musculoskeletal Relaxants
Substance Detected As Detection Time in Urine
Carisoprodol Carisoprodol 1 day
Meprobamate Meprobamate 2 to 3 days
Stimulants
Substance Detected As Detection Time in Urine
Amphetamines Amphetamine 3 to 5 days
Cocaine metabolite (BE) Benzoylecgonine 1 to 2 days
Methamphetamine AMPH & MAMPH 3 to 5 days
Methylenedioxyamphetamine MDA 3 to 5 days
Methylenedioxymethamphetamine MDA & MDMA 3 to 5 days
Methylenedioxyethylamphetamine MDA & MDEA 3 to 5 days
Other Substances
Substance Detected As Detection Time in Urine
Cannabinoids (THC) THC-COOH Up to 45 days
Phencyclidine (PCP) PCP Unknown
Nicotine Cotinine 1 to 3 days
Alcohol EtOH 2 to 10 hours

CBD, Medical Marijuana, and Workplace Drug Testing!

During this training, you will learn about CBD Oils & Medical Marijuana and their impact on the workplace!

– CBD Oil vs. THC – what is the difference?

– Will CBD Oil products show up on a drug test?

– Medical Marijuana – Understanding the General Process

– Know Your State Laws

– Building Your Policy and Drug-Free Workplace Program- Important Considerations

– The Case Against Excluding Marijuana Testing From Your Substance Abuse Policy

 

2020 Webinar Schedule

Below is our 2020 Webinar Schedule.  All of the webinars listed with an asterisk (*) beside the date are offered at no charge! All other webinars are $35 per attendee. If you would like to register, please contact us!

January 30th *                                                                                         2:00- 2:45 pm

CBD Oils and Medical Marijuana – Understanding the Impact on the Workplace

February 27th                                                                                          1:30- 3:30 pm

Reasonable Suspicion Supervisory Training- A Must!

March 31st                                                                                               1:30- 2:30 pm

Driver Qualification Files – Detailed Requirements, Processes, and Procedures

April 30th *                                                                                               2:00- 2:45 pm

Hair Testing, Oral Fluid Testing, and Urine Drug Testing – Finding the Best Fit

May 27th *                                                                                                2:00- 2:45 pm

Developing a non-DOT Testing Program – Adding a Non-DOT Testing Program to Your Existing DOT Testing Program

June 30th                                                                                                   2:00- 2:45 pm

FMCSA Vehicle Maintenance Recordkeeping and Preventive Maintenance Program – What is Required?

July 29th                                                                                                    2:00- 3:00 pm

DOT Drug Testing Programs – The Basics

August26th                                                                                               1:30- 2:30 pm

Hours of Service 101 – The Basics of Recordkeeping, Regulations, and Exemptions

September 30th *                                                                                   2:00- 2:45 pm

Substance Abuse and Addiction in the Workplace – the Impact on the Employer

October 28th *                                                                                         2:00- 2:45 pm

Behind the Scenes of the Medical Review Officer Process –What Really Happens

November 18th *                                                                                    2:00- 2:45 pm

Expanding your Drug Free Workplace Program –Reasons to Review Your Current Program Now

December 10th *                                                                                     2:00- 2:45 pm

Current Trends and Alerts in Substance Abuse

2020 DOT Random Testing Rates

The following outlines the annual minimum drug and alcohol random testing rates established within DOT Agencies and the USCG for 2020.

DOT Agency 2020 Random Drug Testing Rate 2020 Random Alcohol Testing Rate
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) 50% 10%
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 25% 10%
Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) 25% – Covered Service 10% – Covered Service
50% – Maintenance of Way 25% – Maintenance of Way
Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) 50% N/A
Federal Transit Administration (FTA) 50% 10%
United States Coast Guard (USCG) 50% N/A

 

Note: Employers (and C/TPAs) subject to more than one DOT agency drug and alcohol testing rule may continue to combine covered employees into a single random selection pool.

 

USCG covered employees may be combined with DOT covered employees in drug testing pools even though the USCG is now part of the Department of Homeland Security.